Shaping

Home

*

Clamps

*

Tools

*

Barrels

*

Sinking

*

Marking

*

Shaping

*

Grooving

*

Burning

*

Strobes

*

Tuning

*

Painting

*

Chroming

*

Downloads

Perhaps the most critical part of making a good pan comes in the shaping. I often say that a well shaped pan in the hands of a mediocre pan tuner makes a better instrument than a poorly shaped pan in the hands of a highly skilled tuner.

The early stages of the shaping process can be done using a sinking hammer, but fairly quickly one should switch over to a nylon prep hammer. The last stage of the shaping should be done with the flat face of a ball pein hammer, and takes a long time. You should envisage spending many hours just sliding this hammer across the interstitial steel, removing every last little bump and crater.

It's very important to have a good idea of what the finished shape of the pan is going to be before you start shaping the drum. The software in the downloads section can help you define the shape you're looking for. Be prepared to measure often and accurately.

I always start the shaping process by working in the channels in between the rim notes. I use the air hammer with the rounded sinking tip. I'm careful not to work above the 2" line with this tip as its possible to introduce hammer marks that cannot be removed.

It's critical to keep the channels balanced, both in respect to each other and in terms of the channel itself.

Keeping the channel balanced relative to the other channels is pretty simple, its just a case of measuring the depth of each channel and making sure they're all the same.

Keeping the channel properly balanced is a bit more tricky; well, it required discipline. What I'm talking about here is making sure that the left, center, and right of each channel is the same depth. If the channel is "cupped" or "tipped", you should expect to encounter issues at the time of tuning the pan.

With the elliptical note system, the channels change width extensively around the notes. It's important to ensure that the channels remain balanced across the entire width of the channel.

I'll post some photo's of good and bad channels when I make my next pan.


Copyright (c) Pantuner, Inc. 2018